Teen dating abuse charts

Estimates of physical and sexual coercion among college students are even higher, ranging from 20% to 30% (Wekerle , 2009).

This report examines the prevalence and characteristics of incidents of police-reported dating violence in Canada.

However, teens use a range of terms to characterize their romantic relationships; common terms include—hanging out, hooking up, going out, crushing, flirting, seeing, etc.

Try not to let the differences in language keep you from being on the same page in talking with your kids about these relationships.

The 1993 Violence Against Women Survey (VAWS) found that 16% of women had experienced physical or sexual violence in a dating relationship since the age of 16.

Emotional abuse may include isolating a dating partner by trying to control the time they spend with friends and family, limiting the activities someone is involved in, or humiliating a dating partner through social sabotage.

Sometimes abusers use technology—texting, calls, instant messages, or social networking sites—to check up on a partner and try to control their behavior.

Please "contact-us" to request a format other than those available.

by Tina Hotton Mahony Prevalence of police-reported dating violence Victims of dating violence most likely to be female Differences in rates of dating violence between the sexes decline with age Increase in police-reported rates of dating violence Common assault most likely offence in dating violence Similar proportion of male and female victims of dating violence sustained injuries More than 4 in 10 incidents of dating violence occur in the victim's home Dating violence involving female victims more likely to lead to charges Homicides perpetrated in dating relationships Summary Methodology Detailed data tables References Notes According to results of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY), approximately 71% of youth in Canada report being in a dating relationship by the age of 15.

545

Leave a Reply