Dating buildings brickwork

This information may be on the deeds or referred to in a local history book.If this information is not available, or you just want an approximate date, unless there is a date mark on the house or a similar neighbour, you will have to resort to the style of the building.Each method has a distinct role in the investigation of historic buildings.None is infallible and before embarking on an extensive dating survey, due thought must be given to what might be achieved and which methods might be the more successful. Whilst earlier types of wooden joints may be copied in later buildings and earlier styles may be reintroduced in later periods to confound the conservationist or historian, any reuse of older materials should become obvious by the use of the chronometrical methods described here.The census records, currently available for 1891, 1881 and previous decades can be used for an approximate date.Another source of information may be the original owners of the land; this may have been, for example, a religious trust or a member of the nobility.The incorporation of ancient bog oak into a building, no matter how intricately carved or jointed, would immediately become obvious to the chronologist, as would timber renovations.

The Tudors further patterned their brickwork by inserting headers of over burnt or vitrified bricks into the walling.

From unsophisticated early work, brick building entered its heyday, rivalling stone in its popularity as a structural material.

Bricks were generally made on site in wood, heather or turf fired clamps by itinerant workers.

Look for an indentation on the brick's surface. If the bricks have ornamental moldings or glazes, these are indicators of manufacture and use during the Victorian era.

Older bricks do not have a dent in the middle, called a frog.

335

Leave a Reply